International Institute of Social History

IISG
Created on Nov 7th, 2017
Members

Querying the Labour Conflicts database

Created 14 days ago

The Labour Conflicts database contains information on more than 15,000 strikes, lock outs and other labour conflicts in the Netherlands between 1372 and 2018. This datastory explores the possibilities of "free" text search by means of Sparql queries.

Datamodel for the Labour Conflicts database

Created 6 months ago

The source for our project is a relational database maintained in Access. A selection of tables from this database has been exported in simple csv format. From there we transform the data to a RDF serialization format, for instance using CoW. The datamodel described on this page is applied in this transformation.

What's in a colour, especially 'red'?

Created 9 months ago

Sometimes you want to browse an archive by a colour. For example, 'red'! Choose what type of material you're after, and we'll show you all our red stuff! To narrow the results a bit you can add a topic of your own. Note, since this is a fun exercise, you won't find anything on 'red army'! Good luck and don't forget to tweet those results @IISG_Amsterdam!

Entering bounding box metadata in Dataverse

Created a year ago

Providing geospatial metadata in Dataverse

Recently, the senior researchers' assembly discussed the need to visualize the availability of datasets at the IISG. While more advanced options are being discussed, a simple and easy to implement method would be to use the geospatial metadata fields provided in Dataverse.

To edit the geospatial metadata to your dataset in Dataverse, make sure you are logged in. Go to your specific dataset, click edit dataset on the right, click metadata and scroll down to the header Geospatial Metadata, which is usually found close to the bottom of the screen.

The image below highlights the section after you have expanded the Geospatial Metadata header by clicking on it.

Heterogeneity in representations of IISG film meta-data

Created a year ago

This story is based on a conversation I had with Frank de Jong, archivist at the IISG. He mentioned that metadata on movies has been stored at varying levels of granualarity. What follows are a couple of examples he mentioned.